Tuesday, 12 July 2016

ENglish - VinglisH!

Dear Students,
English Section in the exam is a section where some students score very well but others even fail to clear cut-off. Learning Grammar is really essential to score good marks. But, what happens is that students from various boards where lesser attention is paid on English language fail to apply grammar during the examination even if they know the rules. 

So, conclusion is that practicing in some interesting way so that the things remain intact in your mind is important. Keeping this in mind, we have launched this series of "ENglish - VinglisH". We have done enough for some common mistakes which we do while speaking, writing and communicating in English. Now we will discuss about the use of some basic words in English.

This is the ninth post of ENglish - VinglisH. Hope you people like it.

So, lets start now!!


1. Affect/effect
It’s an easy enough mistake to make given how similar these two words look and sound, but there’s a simple explanation to help you remember the difference.

The rules:

1. Affect is a verb“to affect” – meaning to influence or have an impact on something.
2. Effect is the noun“a positive effect” – referring to the result of being affected by something.
3. There is also a verb “to effect”, meaning to bring something about – “to effect a change”. However, this is not very commonly used, so we’ve left it out of the examples below to avoid confusion.

How not to do it:

1. He waited for the medicine to have an affect.
2. They were directly effected by the flooding.

How to do it properly:

1. He waited for the medicine to have an effect.
2. They were directly affected by the flooding.

2. i.e. and e.g.
These two abbreviations are commonly confused, and many people use them interchangeably. However, their uses are very different.

The rules:

1. i.e. means “that is” or “in other words”. It comes from the Latin words “id est”.
2. e.g. means “for example”. It comes from the Latin words “exempli gratia”.
3. Only use “i.e.” and “e.g.” when writing informally. In formal documents, such as essays, it is better to write out the meanings (“for example” or “that is”).

How not to do it:

1. He liked many different cheeses, i.e. cheddar, camembert and brie.
2. He objects to the changes – e.g. he won’t be accepting them.

How to do it properly:

1. He liked many different cheeses, e.g. cheddar, camembert and brie.
2. He objects to the changes – i.e. he won’t be accepting them.



FROM TOMORROW ONWARD WE WILL DISCUSS "TENSES".











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