Monday, 11 July 2016

ENglish - VinglisH!

Dear Students,
English Section in the exam is a section where some students score very well but others even fail to clear cut-off. Learning Grammar is really essential to score good marks. But, what happens is that students from various boards where lesser attention is paid on English language fail to apply grammar during the examination even if they know the rules. 

So, conclusion is that practicing in some interesting way so that the things remain intact in your mind is important. Keeping this in mind, we have launched this series of "ENglish - VinglisH". We have done enough for some common mistakes which we do while speaking, writing and communicating in English. Now we will discuss about the use of some basic words in English.
This is the eighth post of ENglish - VinglisH. Hope you people like it.

So, lets start now!!

1. Me/myself/I
The matter of how to refer to oneself causes all manner of conundrums, particularly when referring to another person in the same sentence. Here’s how to remember whether to use “me”, “myself” or “I”.

The rules:

1. When referring to yourself and someone else, put their name first in the sentence.
2. Choose “me” or “I” by removing their name and seeing which sounds right.
    For example, with the sentence “John and I are off to the circus”, you wouldn’t say “me is off to the circus” if it was just you; you’d say “I am off to the circus”. Therefore when talking about going with someone else, you say “John and I”.
3. You only use “myself” if you’ve already used “I”, making you the subject of the sentence.

How not to do it:

1. Me and John are off to the circus
2. Myself and John are going into town
3. Give it to John and I to look after

How to do it properly:

1. John and I are off to the circus
2. John and I are going into town
3. Give it to John and me to look after
4. I’ll deal with it myself
5. I thought to myself 

2. Invite/invitation
This mistake is now so common that it’s almost accepted as an alternative, but if you really want to speak English properly, you should avoid it.

The rules:

1. “Invite” is a verb – “to invite”. It refers to asking someone if they’d like to do something or go somewhere.
2. “Invitation” is a noun – “an invitation”. It refers to the actual message asking someone if they’d like to do something or go somewhere.

How not to do it:

1. I haven’t responded to her invite yet.
2. She sent me an invite.

How to do it properly:

1. I haven’t responded to her invitation yet.
2. She sent me an invitation.
3. I’m going to invite her to join us. 

3. Who/whom
Another conundrum arising from confusion over how to refer to people. There are lots in the English language!

The rules:

1. “Who” refers to the subject of a sentence; “whom” refers to the object.
2. “Who” and “whom” work in the same way as “he” or “him”. You can work out which you should use by asking yourself the following:
3. “Who did this? He did” – so “who” is correct. “Whom should I invite? Invite him” – so “whom” is correct.
4. “That” is often used incorrectly in place of “who” or “whom”. When referring to a person, you should not use the word “that”.

How not to do it:

1. Who shall I invite?
2. Whom is responsible?
3. He was the only person that wanted to come

How to do it properly:

1. Whom shall I invite?
2. Who is responsible?
3. He was the only person who wanted to come 










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