English Language Quiz For IBPS SO Prelims: 27th December 2018



English Language Quiz For IBPS SO Prelims

IBPS SO Exam is on its way and a lot of aspirants are heading towards new hopes with this upcoming opportunity. Thus, the English Language can be an impetus for their success by helping them save crucial time and score good points in lesser time and effort. So, instead of boiling the ocean, try building up a strong vocabulary, an effective knowledge of grammar, and efficient comprehension skills so as to be on the ball to face this particular section. Here is a quiz on English Language being provided by Adda247 to let you practice the best of latest pattern English Questions for upcoming IBPS SO Exam.






Directions (1-5): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. 

Prepare for the “new abnormal”. That was what California Governor Jerry Brown told reporters last month, commenting on the deadly wildfires that have plagued the state this year. He’s right. California’s latest crisis builds on years of record-breaking droughts and heatwaves. The rest of the world, too, has had more than its fair share of extreme weather in 2018. The Lancet Countdown on health and climate change announced last week that 157 million more people were exposed to heatwave events in 2017, compared with 2000.Such environmental disasters will only intensify. Governments, rightly, want to know what to do. Yet the climate-science community is struggling to offer useful answers.

In October 2018, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a report setting out why we must stop global warming at 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels, and how to do so. If the planet warms by 2 °C — the widely touted temperature limit in the 2015 Paris climate agreement — twice as many people will face water scarcity than if warming is limited to 1.5 °C. That extra warming will also expose more than 1.5 billion people to deadly heat extremes, and hundreds of millions of individuals to vector-borne diseases such as malaria, among other harms.

But the latest IPCC special report underplays another alarming fact: global warming is accelerating. Three trends — rising emissions, declining air pollution and natural climate cycles — will combine over the next 20 years to make climate change faster and more furious than anticipated. In our view, there’s a good chance that we could breach the 1.5 °C level by 2030, not by 2040 as projected in the special report (see ‘Accelerated warming’). The climate-modelling community has not grappled enough with the rapid changes that policymakers care most about, preferring to focus on longer-term trends and equilibria.

Q1. In what reference has the California Governor used the phrase “new abnormal” in the above passage?
In context to extreme weather conditions due to record breaking years of heatwaves and droughts.
In context to cloud burst and excessive floods.
In context to rising poverty.
In context to deadly wildfires that have plagued the state.
Both (a) and (d)
Solution:
According to the first paragraph of the passage, both options (a) and (d) are correct.

Q2. What were the two main points stated out in the report released by IPCC in October 2018?
Rising poverty and economic crisis
Resource allocation problem and how to overcome it.
Why to stop global warming at 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and how to stop it.
Why to stop using pesticides and fertilizers for farming and how to do so.
None of the above
Solution:
Refer to the second paragraph of the passage.

Q3. What will be the harmful effects of extra warming according to the IPCC report?
It will expose more than 1.5 billion people to deadly heat extremes.
Expose hundreds of millions of individuals to vector-borne diseases such as malaria, among other harms.
Cause great damage to livestock
Both (a) and (b)
All of the above
Solution:
Refer to the second paragraph of the passage. According to which both options (a) and (b) are correct.

Q4. Which of the following is SIMILAR to the word GRAPPLED given in BOLD in the passage?
disconnect
confront
liberate
reject
release
Solution:
‘Grappled’ means to try to overcome or deal; ‘confront’ means to stand or come in front of in order to make a deal or face a situation.

Q5. Which of the following is OPPOSITE to the word PLAGUED given in BOLD in the passage?
afflict
haunt
comfort
badger
pain
Solution:
‘Plagued’ means to cause a lot of discomfort and problem specially health-wise.

Directions (6-10): In each of the following sentences, there are two blank spaces. Below the sentences, there are five options with a pair of words each. Fill up the sentences with the pair of words that make the sentence grammatically and contextually correct. 

Q6. Three years into his ------------ in 2017, the chief minister of Maharashtra, Devendra Fadnavis of the Bharatiya Janata Party warned his party’s prickly ally Shiv Sena to quit trying to don the ----------- of the Opposition.
span, hold
tenure, mantle
agreement, discord
arena, strength
None of the above
Solution:
‘tenure’ and ‘mantle’ are the correct words here. ‘tenure’ means a period of time specially used in reference to the duration of the post of a person in an organization. ‘Mantle’ means something that covers, envelops, or conceals.

Q7. The ---------------- power of the mob made itself felt once again when the Ajmer Literature Festival abruptly ------------- veteran actor Naseeruddin Shah’s keynote address.
prompt, fearful
alarming, agreed
intimidatory, cancelled
louring, assisting
None of the above
Solution:
‘Intimidatory’ and ‘cancelled’ are correct here. ‘intimidate’ means to instill fear.

Q8. The Union Home Secretary, last week, ------------- an order authorising 10 Central agencies to monitor, intercept and ---------- information which is transmitted, generated, stored in or received by any computer.
crafted, docile
framed, dilated
amalgamated, intercession
promulgated, decrypt
None of the above
Solution:
‘Promulgated’ and ‘decrypt’ are correct here. ‘Promulgate’ means to make known by open declaration; publish; proclaim formally or put into operation (a law, decree of a court, etc.). and ‘decrypt’ means to decode or decipher.

Q9. Section 69 of the IT Act is so ------------ worded that it could enable mass surveillance to achieve relatively far less serious aims such as preventing the incitement of the commission of a ------------- offence.
broadly, cognizable
hugely, violence
vastly, dispute
vividly, indisputable
None of the above
Solution:
‘Broadly’ and ‘cognizable’ are correct here. ’Cognizable’ means capable of being perceived or known.

Q10. Section 69 also falls --------- of meeting with the principles of natural justice by ----------- to accommodate pre-decisional hearings.
short, failing
full, nailing
largely, appropriately
mostly, growing
None of the above
Solution:
‘Short’ and ‘failing’ are correct words here.

Directions (11-15): In each of the questions given below a/an idiom/phrase is given in bold which is then followed by five options which then try to decipher its meaning. Choose the option which gives the correct meaning of the phrases. 

Q11. William will keep quiet only when pigs fly.
Something that will happen when pigs will fly.
Something that will happen when situation will become worse.
Something that is impossible to happen
Something that will make someone angry
None of the above
Solution:
when pigs fly’ means something that is impossible to happen.

Q12. A full day in a resort with all three meals is just seventh heaven.
In state of extreme heaven
A sense of pride
A sense of dignity
In state of extreme happiness
None of the above
Solution:
seventh heaven’ means in a sense of extreme happiness.

Q13. The grocery store is giving away free candy, no strings attached.
To intervene in a fight
To leave out no strings attached to one another
To show honesty and dedication towards one’s job
None of the above
To show that an offer or opportunity carries no special conditions or restrictions.
Solution:
no strings attached’ means to show that an offer or opportunity carries no special conditions or restrictions.

Q14. Fuel these days costs an arm and a leg.
To be very expensive
To be very delicate
To be very inexpensive
To be very irritating
None of the above
Solution:
cost an arm and a leg’ means to be very expensive.

Q15. He hit the nail on the head when he said this company needs more HR support.
To describe a situation falsely with an intension to mislead someone
To impose a condition on someone
To describe exactly what is causing a situation or problem.
To be docile
None of the above
Solution:
hit the nail on the head’ means to describe exactly what is causing a situation or problem.

               



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