Bank Exams English Notes 2019 | Govt Exams English Notes

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Study Notes are really essential and effective while preparing for any competitive exam. We all have been making and studying through study notes since our childhood. Its one of the most important steps of preparation and a very effective tool for last minute revision. Your mind collects data of random details in the form of keywords and memory maps visualized during preparation. Jotting down main phrases & keywords, making memory maps and highlighting important facts help one speed up the learning process.  

SENTENCE AND ITS TYPES


A sentence is the largest unit of any language. In English, it begins with a capital letter and ends with a full-stop, or a question mark, or an exclamation mark.
Example:
She is a good girl (statement), Is she a good girl? (question), What a nice weather! (exclaiming).

Ideally, a sentence requires at least one subject and one verb. Sometimes the subject of a sentence can be hidden, but the verb must be visible and present in the sentence. Verb is called the heart of a sentence.  
Example:
Do it. (In this sentence, a subject ‘you’ is hidden but verb ‘do’ is visible)   

Types of Sentences:
Structurally, sentences are of four types:

Simple sentence
Compound sentence
Complex sentence, and
Compound-complex sentence.

Simple sentence

A simple sentence must have a single clause (a single verb) which is independent, and it cannot take another clause.
Example:
I always wanted to become a singer. (One clause – one verb)

Compound sentence
A compound sentence must have more than one independent clause with no dependent clauses. Some specific conjunctions, punctuation, or both are used to join together these clauses.
Example:
I always wanted to become a singer, and she wanted to become a doctor. (Two independent clauses – two verbs)

Complex sentence
A complex sentence also has more than one clause but of one them must be an independent clause and the other/others must be (a) dependent clause(es). There are also some particular connectors for the clauses of a complex sentence to be connected.
Example:
I know that you always wanted to be a singer. (Here, a dependent clause is followed by a connector and an independent clause. The other way around is also possible.)

Compound-complex sentence
A compound-complex sentence (or complex–compound sentence) is a mixture of the features of compound and complex sentences in one sentence. So, it must contain at least two independent clauses and at least one dependent clause.
Example:
I know that you always wanted to become a singer, but I always wanted to become a doctor. (Here, one dependent clause is followed by a complex connector and two independent clauses with a compound conjunction between them.)  

Functionally, sentences are of mainly four types:

Declarative sentence
Imperative sentence
Interrogative sentence, and
Exclamatory sentence

Declarative sentence:
An assertive sentence (declarative sentence) simply expresses an opinion/feeling, or makes a statement, or describes things. In other words, it declares something. This type of sentence ends with a period (i.e., a full-stop).
Example:
I want to be a good cricketer. (a statement)

Imperative sentence:
We use an imperative sentence to make a request or to give a command. Imperative sentences usually end with a period (i.e., a full stop), but under certain circumstances, it can end with a note of exclamation (i.e., exclamation mark).
Example:
Please sit down.

Interrogative sentence:
An interrogative sentence asks a question. Interrogative sentences must end with a note of interrogation (i.e., question mark)
Example:
When are you going to submit your assignment?

Exclamatory sentence.
An exclamatory sentence expresses the overflow of emotions. These emotions can be of happiness, wonder, sorrow, anger, etc. 
Example:
What a day it was!

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