SBI PO Mains English Language Quiz- 13th July 2019

SBI-PO-Main-English-Language-Quiz-13th-July-2019

SBI PO Main- English Miscellaneous Quiz

Students gave the SBI PO preliminary examinations with great enthusiasm and now are preparing for the mains, whose date is already scheduled for 20 July this year. Here is a quiz on the English Language, provided by Adda247 for free so that you can practice the best of the latest pattern of English Questions for SBI PO Examination 2019-20. With this, we wish you all the very best for the results of prelims. Keep the preparation engines running.


Directions (1-10): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases are printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.
The article ‘Chewing the cud’ suggests that “mainstream scientific research” into Panchgavya — milk, curd, ghee, dung and urine — will bring about rural development. The article, however, is merely an attempt at pushing the cow-protection agenda through an embarrassing combination of revivalism, bad science and rhetoric.
The article claims that “substantial research” shows A2 type milk, which comes from indigenous breeds, prevents diseases and disorders like obesity, arthritis and autism. This research is far from substantial — it depends on claims made in some studies that suggest A1 type milk has correlations with certain disorders. This research is not conclusive, in fact most reviews (such as the European Food Safety Authority report in 2009) agree that these correlations put forth are extremely tentative. Even if future research shows a strong correlation between A1 milk and major diseases, to suggest that A2 milk prevents diseases is merely speculation that has absolutely no scientific basis and simply creates a false dichotomy. In addition the authors also do not think it necessary to tell the readers that while 98 per cent of Indian cow breeds give A2 milk, 100 per cent of Indian buffaloes give A2 milk as well. It begs to be asked if the authors would fight as vociferously for research into buffalo milk as they would for cows. Since some of us would find the suggestion of consuming cow urine products to be egregious, the authors try other ways of persuading us to do so. They invoke the WHO report which speculates about the ineffectiveness of antibiotics in the near future and suggest there is global research taking place on cow urine to counter this. They cite two patents have been granted for the “medicinal properties” of urine which supposedly acts as a bio-enhancer and as an anti-cancer agent. These patents (No. 6,896,907 and 6,410,059) granted to Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India are issued in 2002, bear no connection to the WHO report and since then have expired. Both patents admit that “urine distillates from buffalo, camel, deer” also show the same results.
It is evident then that there is no contemporary “global” research, nor is there any specific basis to focus on cow urine. While obtaining a daily dose of anti-cancer urine from a deer might be difficult, the authors’ penchant for research into cow urine specifically as opposed to urine from a buffalo or any other animal is inexplicable.
The authors also refer to the use of cow dung cakes as cooking fuel for the rural population. They claim that since the temperatures from burning these cakes never rises beyond a certain point, it does not obliterate the nutrients in food. Apart from the contribution to air pollution, the use of cow dung as fuel may result to arsenic poisoning, not to mention multiple respiratory ailments that rural women suffer as a result of breathing in smoke that is composed of suspended particulates, formaldehyde and sulphur dioxide. There are also other studies from different regions of India (such as a Jadavpur University study in 2007), that point to incidences of arsenic poisoning from burning cow dung fuel.
Surely the authors are aware of better ways to control heat and nutrients while cooking than using cow dung: There have been considerable national and regional programmes to reduce rural pollution and make cooking environments healthier through construction of biogas plants, increased supply of LPG and awareness campaigns. The authors are extremely narrow-minded, if not regressive, in their celebration of continued use of cow dung as fuel.
In their pursuit of reviving traditional knowledge the authors wax eloquent about the anti-radioactive and anti-thermal properties of cow dung. As scientists who want to bring such knowledge into “mainstream scientific discourse”, I am sure the authors are not far from persuading physicists of our country to plaster our nuclear reactors with fresh cow dung (not buffalo) to save us from a potential Chernobyl or Fukushima type disaster.
While exploring the economic possibilities of rural India’s cattle might be fruitful in other ways, the Panchgavya project seems to be a process by which the authors want to promote the rhetoric on cow protection through a scientific discourse. It is dangerous for knowledge creation and a democracy when leading scientists of our country misuse the vocabulary of rural development and scientific enquiry to pursue projects of religious revivalism.

Q1. According to the author, what are the advantages and disadvantages of using cow dung cakes as cooking fuel for rural population?
Cow dung cakes have the ability not to rise above the critical point due to that it does not destroy the nutrients of the food but it leads to diseases and disorders like arthritis and autism.
Cow dung cakes are cheaper than LPG to be used as cooking fuel for rural population but lead to destroy of nutrients of food.
Cow dung cakes do not destroy the nutrients of the food and lead to air pollution that leads to arsenic poisoning.
Cow dung cakes are easily available to rural population while air pollution is the biggest disadvantage of using it as a cooking fuel.
None of these
Solution:
Refer to the first few lines of fourth paragraph, “The author also suffer……………… and sulphur dioxide.”
Hence sentence (c) is correct in context of the passage.

Q2. According to the author, what are the best ways to control the heat and nutrients while cooking than using cow dung?
Construction of biogas plants.
Right kind of cow breeding.
Awareness campaigns related to rural pollution and environment protection.
Both (a) and (c) are correct
All of these
Solution:
Refer to the starting lines of sixth paragraph, “Surely the authors………………….. awareness campaigns”. Hence both sentences (a) and (c) are correct in context of the passage.


Q3. According to the passage, what does the article ‘Chewing the cud’ profess? 

(i) The substantial research shows that most of the Indian cows and buffaloes give A2 type milk. 

(ii) It profess that A1 type of milk has no correlations with certain disorders. 
(iii) A2 type of milk prevents diseases and disorders like obesity, arthritis, autism.

Only (i) is correct
Only (ii) is correct
Only (iii) is correct
Both (i) and (ii) are correct
Both (i) and (iii) are correct
Solution:
Refer to the first few lines of second paragraph, “The article claims ……………………..autism”. Hence only sentence (iii) is true in context of the passage

Q4. According to the passage, what is the author’s tone in use of cow dung cakes as a fuel?
myopic
progressive
aggressive
argumentative
antagonist
Solution:
Refer to the last line of sixth paragraph. The author here refers to as narrow minded for continued use of cow dung as a fuel. Hence option (a) is true in context of the passage.

Q5. Which of the following is false in context of the passage?
It begs to be asked if the authors would fight as vociferously for research into buffalo milk as they would for cows.
It is dangerous for knowledge creation and a democracy when leading scientists of our country misuse the vocabulary of rural development and scientific enquiry to pursue projects of religious revivalism.
In their pursuit of reviving traditional knowledge the authors wax eloquent about the anti-radioactive and anti-thermal properties of cow dung.
They cite two patents have been granted for the medicinal properties of urine which supposedly acts as an anti bio-enhancer and as an anti-cancer agent.
There are also other studies from different regions of India that point to incidences of arsenic poisoning from burning cow dung fuel.
Solution:
Refer to the third last sentence of second paragraph, “They cite two patents………………………..anti-cancer agents”. Hence sentence (d) is false in context of the passage.

Q6. Which of the following is true in context of the passage?
(i) The author claims that since the temperatures from burning these cakes rise beyond a certain point, it does not obliterate the nutrients in food.
(ii) It is evident that there is a contemporary global research to focus on cow urine.
(iii) Both patents admit that urine distillates from buffalo, camel, deer also shows the same results.
Only (i) is true
Only (iii) is true
Both (i) and (iii) are true
Both (ii) and (iii) are true
All are true
Solution:
Refer to the last line of second paragraph, “Both patents………………… same results.” Hence sentence (iii) is true in context of the passage.

Q7. Choose the word/group of words which is most similar in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.
Vociferously
sumptuous
vehemently
ritzy
brusque
salacious
Solution:
Vociferously means in a loud and forceful manner. Hence it has same meaning as vehemently. Sumptuous means splendid and expensive looking.
Ritzy means luxurious.
Brusque means abrupt.
Salacious means obscene or improper.

Q8. Choose the word/group of words which is most similar in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.
Rhetoric
canoodle
nuzzle
palpable
annunciation
oratory
Solution:
Rhetoric means the art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing. Hence it has the same meaning as oratory.
Annunciation means announcement.
Palpable means perceptible to touch.
Nuzzle and Canoodle mean to embrace

Q9. Choose the word/group of words which is most opposite in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.
Eloquent
vertigo
apathetic
Glib
ingenuous
Suave
Solution:
Eloquent means fluent or persuasive in speaking or writing. Hence it has the opposite meaning as apathetic.
Suave means charming, confident.
Glib means fluent but insincere.
Ingenuous means innocent.
Vertigo means dizziness

Q10. Choose the word/group of words which is most opposite in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.
Tentative
circumspect
evasive
definite
ambiguous
cagey
Solution:
Tentative means no certain or fixed. Hence it has opposite meaning as definite.
Circumspect means wary and unwilling to take risk.
Cagey means secretive.
Evasive means tending to avoid commitment or self-revelation.
Ambiguous means not clear or decided

Q11. five statements are given below, labelled (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E). Among these, four statements are in logical order and form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the option that does not fit into the theme of the passage/paragraph.
They were ambushed and killed by the anarchists, who are hell-bent on stalling the development of the backward tribal areas and exploiting the situation.
In a barbaric and dastardly attack by the outlawed Maoists, India lost 25 brave CRPF personnel.
Much like the separatists and terrorists in Kashmir, they do not want peace.
Some security personnel were also injured.
The attack shocked the conscience of every right-thinking Indian.
Solution:
BADE forms a coherent paragraph while sentence (c) is not a part of the paragraph. The paragraph here is about the attack on CRPF personnel by Maoists. Sentence (c) is not a part of the paragraph as it is about terrorists in Kashmir which does not match with the theme of the paragraph. Hence it is the right option.

Q12. five statements are given below, labelled (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E). Among these, four statements are in logical order and form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the option that does not fit into the theme of the passage/paragraph.
This creation needs the formalisation, urbanisation, industrialisation and human capital catalysed by three 10-year goals in land, labour and capital.
And when fairness and equality clash, people prefer fair inequality over unfair equality.
India has been an unfair economy and society for centuries.
Creating an 800 million-strong middle class is the best way to create a fairer India.
After all, if you don’t have a dream, how can you have a dream come true?
Solution:
Going through the options, we find that sentences in the sequence of CDAE form a coherent paragraph. Here, the theme of the paragraph is creating an 800 million strong middle class India. We can see that all the sentences except sentence (b) are linked to each other. Sentence (b) fails to connect with any other sentence as it talks about equality which is not the theme of the paragraph. Hence sentence (b) is the right option.

Q13. five statements are given below, labelled (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E). Among these, four statements are in logical order and form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the option that does not fit into the theme of the passage/paragraph.
The first “Chikungunya” cases were reported a week back.
The capital city of India, is suddenly gearing up for what it fears is a sure epidemic.
Bring in those experts to demonstrate how such a job is done!
No one knows when the countdown shall start, but what’s the harm in being prepared.
Now comes an executive order that all government hospitals should have sufficient extra beds, even floor mattresses if need be, for a fear of an epidemic.
Solution:
BAED forms a coherent paragraph. It is about gearing up for epidemic disease Chikungunya in India and preparations for its prevention. After reading all the sentences, we conclude that sentence (c) is not a part as it talks about some ‘job’ which does not link to other sentences. Hence sentence (c) is the right option.

Q14. five statements are given below, labelled (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E). Among these, four statements are in logical order and form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the option that does not fit into the theme of the passage/paragraph.
But it gradually turned political, with the ‘religious minority’ beginning to enter the political arena.
And as tribals continue to feel the incessant pressure on their land and demography, Assam appears to be only heading towards a more explosive situation.
The migrants issue was first seen only through the language prism in Assam, leading to the establishment of Assamese as the official language in 1960.
Assam has had a long history of movements against illegal migrants, since the early 20th century.
Thus, a movement that began to protect the language and culture of the indigenous Assamese people by 1985 turned into one to protect political identity too.
Solution:
CAEB forms a coherent paragraph while sentence (d) is not a part of the paragraph. The paragraph here revolves around the theme of protecting the Assamese language and culture and the issue turned into political. Sentence (d) does not connect with the other sentences as it talks about Assam’s history against illegal migrants. Hence sentence (d) is the right option.

Q15. five statements are given below, labelled (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E). Among these, four statements are in logical order and form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the option that does not fit into the theme of the passage/paragraph.
When mighty opposition leaders accused Modi of using demonetisation to steal money from the poor to give his rich friends, not even the most gullible voter was fooled.
If Modi continues to be a brand that Indian voters buy, it is because he seems very different to the kind of political leaders they have so far been used to.
He does not lead a political party that is in fact a family business to be handed down to some heir.
And his message remains mostly positive.
He does not have a family that is benefiting financially from his office.
Solution:
BECD forms a coherent paragraph while sentence (a) is not a part of the paragraph. The paragraph talks about the Modi and what differentiates him from others. We see that sentence (a) does not connect with the other sentences as it talks about opposition leaders’ accusation regarding demonetization. Hence sentence (a) is the right choice.

               




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