Quiz: Reading Comprehension

Dear Readers,
                             Today’s comprehension is related to the earthquake that again shook Nepal and major portions of Northern India. These one after another shocks are not only surprising but also carry a very valid reason for its occurrence.  All the aftereffects and the way to mitigate the effects are discussed in the below passage. It can be important for you to analyze the causes and the geographical changes happening in this region of Asia.


Directions (Q.1-10): Read the
following passage carefully and answer the questions given below. Certain
words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them.

The recurrence of a
major earthquake on May 12 — this time measuring 7.3 on the Richter scale —
with its epicentre near Kodari in Nepal, barely a fortnight after the
devastating temblor in the landlocked country, has once again raised
questions about preparedness for such disasters in the subcontinent. India is
divided into five seismic zones, with Zone 5 being the most active and
earthquake-prone. The Himalayan regions, the Assam and Burma region, and the
Bhuj region in the west fall in this category. While the time of occurrence of
a big earthquake cannot be predicted accurately with existing technology, the foreknowledge
of potential danger areas can help mitigate the impact of a disaster. The
reason for earthquakes occurring in Nepal is knvvown: the movement of the
Indian tectonic plate against the Eurasian plate. Along the Himalayas lie two
fault-lines: the Main Boundary Thrust and the Main Central Thrust.
Running parallel to the Himalayan ranges to a width of 100 km to 120 km, this
region has a history of earthquakes. In the last 120 years, there have been
four major events: 1897 (Shillong), 1905 (Himachal Pradesh, Kangra), 1934
(Nepal-Bihar border), 1950 (Arunachal Pradesh, then a part of the North East
Frontier Agency or NEFA).
The movement of the
Indian tectonic plate against the Eurasian plate has created accumulated
stress. This stress is released in a manner that makes predicting earthquakes
impossible. When a major event happens, part of the stress is released at that
point but accumulates in a different part of the belt. Thus there is no natural
escape for the region from susceptibility to earthquakes. The best-laid
plans for disaster mitigation following quakes can go awry, but some
lessons can be learnt from the past. However, as the gap between the occurrence
of major earthquakes in a given region could stretch over more than a lifespan,
memories can fade and mitigation plans may not be grounded in lived
experience.
The real advancement that has been made recently in India is,
for instance, the setting up of many seismological stations, especially after
the Bhuj earthquake of 2001. Measurements from these stations and global
positioning system data now tell us the Indian plate is moving north at a speed
of 5 metres a year. This would contribute to stress accumulation and to seismic
activity even in Zones 2, 3 and 4. We need to accept earthquakes as a reality
and do everything in our power to redefine development plans, especially in
terms of building quake-resistant buildings. There should be systematic resort
to “disaster drills” to educate the public on what to do during an earthquake.
Preparedness is the key to managing any more such disasters.
-Source The Hindu, Delhi Edition, 14th May 

Q.1.Choose an appropriate title
for the passage.
1) Aftershocks
2) Preparedness As The Key
3) The Damage and The Quake
4) The Gross Effect
5) None of The Above
Q.2.What is the reason mentioned
in the passage for zone 2, 3 and 4 to worry about?
1) Due to the movement of Indian Plate into the Eurasian
plate.
2) Due to the volcanic eruption inside the Earth’s
Crate.
3) Due to the movement of plates in the Pacific Ocean.
4) Due to the movement of Earth out of its orbit.
5) None of the above
Q.3.Which of the following is
true according to the passage?
A) The zone 5 region is the most active and earthquake
prone area.
B) The Indian plate is moving southwards with the
speed of 5 metres a year.
C) The movement of the plates results in stress
accumulation.
1) Only A
2) Only B
3) Only C
4) A and C
5) A and B
Q.4. Which of the following is not true
according to the passage?
A) There is no natural escape for the region from susceptibility
to earthquakes
B) India has set up many seismological equipments
after Bhuj quake 2001.
C) The prediction of earthquake is not possible but
the foreknowledge of the big disaster can help mitigate the aftereffect
1) Only A
2) Only B
3) Only C
4) All A, B and C
5) None of these
Q.5.Which of the following is not
the synonym of the word “awry”?
1) preempt
2) recant
3) straight
4) refract
5) None
Q.6.Which of the following is the
synonym of the word “foreknowledge”?
1) savor
2) stint
3) torpor
4) precognition
5) onerous
Q.7.Which of the following is the
synonym of the word “Thrust”?
1) purport
2) broach
3) clamor
4) levity
5) lassitude
Q.8.What does the author mean by
the phrase “mitigation plans may not be grounded in lived experience”?
1) The plans are not to mitigate but to elevate the
casuality.
2) The plans are only for show off, but the ground
reality is different.
3) The plans can only be made but whatever we do, it
will happen.
4) The plans to mitigate the effect might not be handy
while living.
5) None of the above
Q.9.Which of the following is the
synonym of the word “susceptibility”? 
1) unlikely
2) perceptivity
3) resistant
4) apropos
5) ascetic
Q.10.Which of the following is
the synonym of the word “temblor”?
1) disturbance
2) vibration
3) traction
4) Earthquake
5) None of the above

1. (2
2. (1
3. (4
4. (5
5. (3
6. (4
7. (1
8. (4
9. (2
10. (4