SBI PO Prelims English Quiz: 25th May

sbi-po-prelims-english-quiz-24th-may

English Quiz For SBI PO Exam 2019

The SBI PO Prelims Exam is scheduled to be held in a few days and to ace your preparations Bankersadda is launching a crash course of 18 days to help you excel the exams. Here is a quiz on English Language being provided by Adda247 for free to let you practice the best of latest pattern English Questions for SBI PO Examination 2019-20. Video Solutions will also be provided for the same for free.



Directions (1-5): There are four sentences given in each question. Find the sentence(s) which is/are grammatically correct and mark your answer choosing the best possible option among the five options given below each question. If all sentences are correct, choose (e) as your answer. 

Q1. (I) With a little industry and perseverance wonders might be done in this country. 
(II) Almost any job can be shaken off in time and with perseverance. 
(III) Can we rely on the constancy and perseverance of the people? 
(IV) A little did I know that he would create such a ruckus.
Only (I) is correct
Only (IV) is correct
Both (I) and (II) are correct
Only (I), (II) and (III) are correct
All are correct
Solution:
While the quantifier ‘a little’ means something that is not much in quantity, ‘little’ means something that is almost nil. In the case of sentence (IV), there is almost no knowledge of a certain fact.
Hence except (IV), all sentences are grammatically correct.

Q2. (I) The people who come from here will be something to deal with. 
(II) A good deal of pens is not working. 
(III) They have managed to seal a good deal. 
 (IV) It would cost a deal of hard labor, and Captain Fishley would be the only gainer.
Only (I) is correct
Only (II), (III) and (IV) are correct
Only (I), (III) and (IV) are correct
Both (II) and (III) are correct
All are correct
Solution:
“A good deal” is used as a quantifier with uncountable nouns, like work, writing, etc. The phrase, when not used as a quantifier, can simply mean a deal that is good, like in sentence (III). But the phrase cannot be used as a quantifier with countable nouns as in sentence (II). Hence all sentences except (II) are grammatically correct.

Q3. (I)The Secretary and Treasurer were not present at today’s meeting. 
(II) She beckoned to him, but he took no notice, not desiring to be disturbed at present. 
(III) Ramu closely resembles to his father not only in physical features but also in habits. 
(IV) Emotion passed over their features like ripples over a stream.
Only (II) is correct
Both (I) and (II) are correct
Both (II) and (IV) are correct
Both (I) and (III) are correct
All are correct
Solution:
In case of sentence (I), replace ‘were’ by ‘was’ as “The Secretary and Treasurer” denotes the same person. However, if “The Secretary and the Treasurer” were used, then the verb “were” would have been correct as it denotes two different persons and in such cases, it takes plural verb.
e.g. The Secretary and Principal has come.
The Secretary and the Principal have come.
In sentence (III), remove ‘to’ after ‘resembles’ to make the sentence grammatically correct. “Resemble” is a Transitive Verb and thus it is always followed by Object and not ‘to’, ‘with’, etc.
e.g. She resembles her mother.
Hence only sentences (II) and (IV) are grammatically correct.

Q4. (I)Being occupied with important matters, he had no leisure to see us. 
(II)If it were possible to get near when one of the volcanic eruptions take place we should see a grand sight. 
(III)I am better acquainted with the country than you. 
(IV)One must use his best efforts if one wishes to succeed.
Only (I) is correct
Only (III) is correct
Both (I) and (IV) are correct
Only (I), (II) and (III) are correct
All are correct
Solution:
In sentence (II), replace ‘take’ by ‘takes’ to make the sentence grammatically correct as “One of” is followed by a Plural Noun or Pronoun but it always takes Singular verb.
e.g. One of the volcanic eruptions takes place.
In sentence (III), ‘you’ should be followed by ‘are’ as “you” is such a Pronoun which acts the same way in both Nominative Case and Objective Case.
e.g. I like him more than you. [=I like him more than (I like) you.]
I like him more than you do. [=I like him more than you like him.]
In sentence (IV), replace ‘his’ by “one’s” as when the subject of the sentence is “One” and it refers to ‘anybody’ then the possessive of ‘one’ is “one’s”.
e.g. One should be respectful to one’s elders.
Hence only sentence (I) is grammatically correct.

Q5. (I) As a liberal, he had been interested in contemporary politics. 
(II) Ample opportunity was given for explanation and apology for the insult. 
(III) Though the body is bulky, it is yet light and easily sustained by the wings. 
(IV) It is suggested that a ring road should be built to relieve the congestion.
Only (II) is correct
Both (I) and (II) are correct
Both (II) and (IV) are correct
Both (III) and (IV) are correct
All are correct
Solution:
All the given sentences are grammatically correct.

Directions (6-10): In each of the question given below a phrase/idiom is given in bold which is then followed by five options which try to decipher its meaning as used in the sentence. Choose the option which gives the meaning of the phrase/idiom most appropriately in the context of the given sentence. 

Q6. To be competitive, they paid low wages and cut corners on health and safety.
insistent
skimp
obdurate
rigid
lenient
Solution:
Option (b) is the correct answer choice. ‘Cut corners’ means to do something perfunctorily so as to save time or money. Therefore, the word ‘skimp’ is perfectly depicting the meaning of the given idiom. ‘Skimp’ can be used as a noun or a verb which means to expend or use less time, money, or material on something than is necessary in an attempt to economize. All the other words fail to express the meaning of the given idiom.
Insistent means insisting on or demanding something; not allowing refusal.
Obdurate means stubbornly refusing to change one's opinion or course of action.
Rigid means unable to bend or be forced out of shape; not flexible.
Lenient means of a punishment or person in authority more merciful or tolerant than expected.

Q7. They stopped inviting him to the gatherings, and he really got bent out of shape about it.
plumpness
pile
nefarious
subjugate
livid
Solution:
Option (e) is the most suitable answer choice. The idiom ‘to get bent out of shape’ means to take offense; to become angry, agitated or upset. Therefore, the word ‘livid is providing an absolute meaning of the idiom given in bold. ‘Livid means furiously angry. All the other words fail to depict the meaning of the given idiom in bold.
Plumpness means the quality of having a full rounded shape.
Pile means a heap of things laid or lying one on top of another.
Nefarious means (typically of an action or activity) wicked or criminal.
Subjugate means bring under domination or control, especially by conquest.

Q8. The Cambridge Analytica scandal, which merges Facebook’s privacy problem with its politics problem, is in some ways a perfect storm.
disastrous situation
powerful thunder
contagious
embracing event
retribution
Solution:
The most suitable phrase that exactly portrays the meaning of the given idiom in bold is ‘disastrous situation’. ‘A perfect storm’ means an especially bad situation caused by a combination of unfavourable circumstances. All the other words given in options fail to provide the meaning of the given idiom. Hence, option (a) becomes the most viable answer choice.
Powerful thunder means a strong climatic thunder
Contagious means (of a disease) spread from one person or organism to another, typically by direct contact.
Embracing event means a willful accepted event
Retribution means punishment inflicted on someone as vengeance for a wrong or criminal act.

Q9. Assessing the problems of the neighborhood grocery by examining a giant supermarket is comparing apples and oranges.
resplendent
exquisite
surpassed
unparalleled
renowned
Solution:
The most suitable phrase that exactly portrays the meaning of the given idiom in bold is ‘unparalleled’. ‘Comparing oranges and apples’ means something which is both the same and different simultaneously depending on your point of view. ‘Unparalleled’ means two different things which cannot be compared parallelly. All the other words given in options fail to provide the meaning of the given idiom. Hence, option (d) becomes the most viable answer choice.
Resplendent means attractive and impressive through being richly colourful or sumptuous.
Exquisite means extremely beautiful and delicate.
Surpassed means exceed; be greater than.
Renowned means known or talked about by many people; famous.

Q10. I got to the airport a few minutes late and missed the plane by the skin of my teeth.
scantily
gradually
narrowly
recently
deliberately
Solution:
By the skin of my teeth’ means ‘by a very narrow margin; only just.’ Thus, ‘narrowly’ serves as the most just word to describe the meaning of the given idiom in bold. However, all the words do not provide the exact meaning of the idiom. Hence, option (c) is the most feasible answer choice. 
Scantily means in a way that is small or insufficient in quantity or amount.
Gradually means in a gradual way; slowly; by degrees.
Recently means at a recent time; not long ago.
Deliberately means consciously and intentionally; on purpose.

Directions (11-15): Rearrange the following sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E), (F) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph; then answer the questions given below them. 

(A) The yield on German government bonds reached their highest level in 18 months, while that on the 10-year U.S. Treasury bonds reached its highest level in eight weeks.

(B) Notably, the minutes of the European Central Bank’s June meeting indicated that the bank might walk back on its commitment to expand its €60 billion bond purchase programme.

(C) The Bank of England and the Bank of Canada have shown signs of hawkishness.

(D) Bond markets around the globe showed signs of weakness last week, with major central banks hinting at a possible end to years of ultra-loose monetary policy.

(E) The U.S. Federal Reserve has already hiked rates this year, and warned of the risks posed by low rates.

(F) Results of the auction of 30-year French government bonds were the immediate trigger behind the rout as it pointed to a drop in excess demand; the bid-to-cover ratio dropped to 1.5 from 1.93 in January.

Q11. Which of the following should be the FIFTH sentence after rearrangement?
A
B
F
E
C
Solution:
The correct sequence of sentences after rearrangement is DAFBEC.

Q12. Which of the following should be the THIRD sentence after rearrangement?
A
D
B
E
F
Solution:
The correct sequence of sentences after rearrangement is DAFBEC.

Q13. Which of the following should be the FIRST sentence after rearrangement?
B
F
D
C
E
Solution:
The correct sequence of sentences after rearrangement is DAFBEC.

Q14. Which of the following should be the SECOND sentence after rearrangement?
F
E
A
B
C
Solution:
The correct sequence of sentences after rearrangement is DAFBEC.

Q15. Which of the following should be the LAST sentence after rearrangement?
D
A
B
C
E
Solution:
The correct sequence of sentences after rearrangement is DAFBEC.

               



You may also like to Read:
             
                

No comments