English Quiz for IBPS PO Mains: 24th October

IBPS PO Mains English Quiz

The English language perplexes most of the students and makes one nervous during the examination even if the answer to the question is known. But there are no formulas to cramp or the longer the calculation to deal with. The mistakes that occur are because of the lack of confidence. With proper strategy, Study NotesQuizzesVocabulary one can calm his/her nerves and excel in no time. Make the reading newspaper, editorial a habit, and also participate in the daily quiz. The IBPS PO 2019 is just one step away from your reach. Here is the quiz under the Study Plan ‘FATEH’, on the IBPS PO Mains English Quiz and we have  Reading Comprehension  for 24th of October 2019. You can also check out the latest books for IBPS PO 2019

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Directions (1-8): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

In India, English is like one of those damp squib crackers that tend to explode in your face. Sometimes, the faces are literary, as in the exchange between Salman Rushdie and the renowned Marathi writer, Bhalchandra Nemade, in 2015. More often, the faces are political, such as that of Vice President Venkaiah Naidu, who was recently in the news for castigating English as a “disease” left behind by the British. Actually, Mr. Naidu was misrepresented by many. Even though he was speaking on the occasion of Hindi Divas at Vigyan Bhawan in New Delhi and he espoused the cause of Hindi as a national language, he had in mind other Indian languages too. Mr. Naidu reportedly said that “all Indian languages” are “vibrant” and there are many other Indian languages which “are older and more vibrant than Hindi”. So, it was not, as his critics made it sound, a question of Hindi triumphalism. He was talking of Indian mother tongues in general, and excluding English from that category. To an extent, he had a point, though one can object that English is the mother tongue of at least some Anglo-Indians all over the country, and probably some other Indians in the far eastern States. Still, the fact remains that English is rarely a mother tongue in India, though it is often a first language.

For instance, it is definitely not my mother tongue, though my mother can speak it with some effort. However, it is by far my first language — partly because I studied all my school subjects, except Hindi and Sanskrit, in English, and partly because the petty political squabbles between Hindi and Urdu left me alienated from both. Apart from, perhaps, the question of aptitude. Incidentally, moving from the personal to the public, critics of English overlook the neutralising and nationally cohesive force that English exerts on linguistic rivalries within India — enabling equivalent commerce between, say, educated Tamil, Hindi and Bangla speakers without their having to face a potentially irksome Hindi monopoly in U.P., Tamil monopoly in Tamil Nadu, or Bangla monopoly in West Bengal. Take English out of that matrix and we will be faced with more divisive linguistic politics in the States.

Though many cosmopolitan critics took umbrage at Mr. Naidu’s dismissal of English, I agree with his call to pay more attention to our mother tongues such as Tamil, Bangla, Hindi and Marathi, spoken by millions. There is nothing wrong about such a call. Where Mr. Naidu, and many others, go wrong is by turning this call into an ‘either-or’ issue — either we pay attention to English or we pay attention to other Indian languages. This is not how the matter should stand. If English is a ‘disease’ left behind by the British, then it is an advantageous disease: it has enabled the educated Indian middle class to be internationally competitive without any extra effort by the Indian government. In the pure sciences, medicine, engineering, literature, history, and so on, the easy access that a few million privileged Indians have to English texts has been converted into useful capital.

The Chinese have realised a basic fact. There is always a first language of specialised communication. In the ancient Indian past, it was Sanskrit, though other languages — often referred to as Prakrit — were spoken by the masses. In medieval Europe, it was Latin; in much of medieval Asia, it was Persian. These ‘proto-global’ languages did not lead to the death of other languages. Instead, they enabled the exchange of knowledge, thought, ideas. Today English is the global language, for better and for worse, and the British inadvertently gave Indians an edge here. Unfortunately, we are more busy diagnosing the diseases of the past than taking advantage of their after-effects in the present. Not just the Chinese, but various other peoples are catching up, even as we Indians consciously weaken our head start in English. In Denmark, for instance, English is compulsory from the primary classes onwards, and Denmark is an affluent, one-language country that can easily afford translations in Danish. This is the case in most of Europe, even in countries with strong linguistic nationalisms. Some educationists in Europe even argue that learning English will soon not give you an advantage, as every educated world citizen will be reasonably fluent in it. They propose that ambitious schools should teach other major languages — Arabic, Spanish, French, Hindi, Chinese — along with English, and, of course, the national or regional language. As I said, this is not an ‘either-or’ matter. English needs to be used along with other Indian languages, and vice versa. We will deprive only ourselves if we turn it into an ‘either-or’ issue.

Q1. According to the passage how has English become neutralizing and nationally cohesive force that exerts on linguistic rivalries within India?
(a)English as a language enables a familiar environment and generates a cohesive force of nationalism among the people of the country.
(b)Without English in the matrix, there will be more divisive linguistic politics in the states.
(c)English as a language, for different educated people from different states like Tamil Nadu, U.P. and West Bengal enables a mean of commerce without their having to face a regional language.
(d)Both (b) and (c)
(e)None of these

Q2. According to the author, where ministers and linguistic rivals go wrong when it comes to take a call between English and their mother tongue?
(a) Where ministers and many others go wrong is by turning this call as, either we pay attention to English or we pay attention to other Indian languages.
(b)Ministers and many other linguistic rivals start discrimination between English and their mother tongue.
(c)Ministers provoke people to adopt the Hindi language as their mother tongue.
(d)Both (a) and (c)
(e)None of these

Q3.On the occasion of Hindi Divas at Vigyan Bhawan in New Delhi how Mr. Naidu’s speech by many critics was given a name of a question of Hindi triumphalism?
(a)It was misinterpreted that one can object that English is the mother tongue of at least some Anglo-Indians, and probably some other Indians in the far eastern States.
(b)He was misinterpreted for talking of Indian mother tongues in general, and excluding English from that category.
(c)He was misinterpreted for not having any other Indian language in mind while espousing the cause of Hindi as a national language.
(d)Both (b) and (c)
(e)None of these

Q4. Why has the author called English as an advantageous disease?
(a)It has enabled the educated Indian middle class society to be internationally competitive without any extra effort by the Indian government.
(b)It has enabled the easy access for Indians in the pure sciences, medicine, engineering, literature etc.
(c)Take English out of that matrix and we will be faced with more divisive linguistic politics in the States.
(d)Both (a) and (b)
(e)None of these

Q5.How ‘proto-global’ languages like Sanskrit, Latin and Persian plays an important role among the peoples of different regions?
(a)They enable the exchange of knowledge, thought, ideas.
(b)English is the global language and the British inadvertently gave Indians an edge here.
(c)Fields of sciences, medicine, engineering, literature, and history have become globally popular.
(d)Both (a) and (c)
(e)None of these

Q6.”In India, English is like one of those damp squib crackers that tend to explode in your face.” In the given sentence what does the bold part implies?
(a)To suffer the worst part of an unpleasant or problematic situation
(b)To remember, think about, or consider someone or something
(c)A situation or event which is much less impressive than expected
(d) To suffer due to someone else’s problem
(e)None of these

Q7. Choose the word which is most nearly the SIMILAR in meaning to the word ‘irksome’ printed in bold as used in the passage.
(a)Pleasant
(b)Agreeable
(c)Pacifying
(d)Placid
(e)Irritating

Q8. Choose the word which is most nearly the OPPOSITE in meaning to the word ‘cosmopolitan’ printed in bold as used in the passage.
(a)Cultivated
(b)Worldly
(c)Cultured
(d)Provincial
(e)Suave

Directions (9-15): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

It was a proud moment for every Indian to see India’s proactive role in mitigating climate change being acknowledged and appreciated by the United Nations Secretary General, António Guterres, and Erik Solheim, the Executive Director of the UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme). Human beings and nature have a very special relationship. Mother Nature has nurtured and nourished us. The first civilisations were established on the banks of rivers. Societies that live in harmony with nature flourish and prosper. Today, human society stands at an important crossroads. The path that we take hereon will not only determine our well-being but also that of the generations who will inhabit our planet after us. The imbalances between our greed and necessities have led to grave ecological imbalances. We can either accept this, go ahead with things as if it is business as usual, or we can take corrective actions. Three things will determine how we as a society can bring a positive change.

The first is internal consciousness. For that, there is no better place to look than our glorious past. Respect for nature is at the core of India’s traditions. The Atharvaveda contains the Prithvi Sukta, which contains unparalleled knowledge about nature and the environment. It is beautifully written in Atharvaveda: Salutations to Mother Earth. In Her is woven together Ocean and River Waters; in Her is contained Food which She manifests when ploughed; In Her indeed is alive all Lives; May She bestow us with that Life. Mahatma Gandhi wrote extensively on the environment and even practised a lifestyle where compassion towards the environment was essential. He propounded the Doctrine of Trusteeship, which places the onus on us, the present generation, to ensure that our coming generations inherit a clean planet. He called for sustainable consumption so that the world does not face a resource crunch. Leading lifestyles that are harmonious and sustainable are a part of our ethos. Once we realise how we are flag bearers of a rich tradition, it will automatically have a positive impact on our actions.

The second aspect is public awareness. We need to talk, write, debate, discuss and deliberate as much as possible on questions relating to the environment. At the same time, it is vital to encourage research and innovation on subjects relating to the environment. This is when more people will know about the pressing challenges of our times and ways to mitigate them. When we as a society are aware of our strong links with environmental conservation and talk about it regularly, we will automatically be proactive in working towards a sustainable environment. That is why, I will put proactiveness as the third facet of bringing a positive change. We see this proactiveness in the Swachh Bharat Mission, which is directly linked to a sustainable future. These are landmark efforts in the quest of reducing the strain on our natural surroundings. We see this proactiveness in the success of the Ujjwala Yojana, which has significantly reduced indoor air pollution due to unhealthy cooking practices that were causing respiratory diseases.

India is moving at a quick pace in cleaning its rivers. The Ganga, which is India’s lifeline, had become polluted in several parts. The Namami Gange Mission is changing this historical wrong. Emphasis is being given to proper treatment of sewage. At the core of our urban development initiatives such as AMRUT and the Smart Cities Mission is the need to balance urban growth with environmental care. Our country is devoting unparalleled attention to new and renewable sources of energy. Over the last four years, this sector has become more accessible and affordable. The Ujala Yojana has led to the distribution of nearly 31 crore LED bulbs. The costs of LED bulbs have reduced and so have the electricity bills and the CO2 emissions.

While the world is talking about climate change, the call for climate justice has also reverberated from India. Climate justice is about safeguarding the rights and interests of the poor and marginalised sections of society, who are often the biggest sufferers from the menace of climate change. The world needs to shift to a paradigm of environmental philosophy that is anchored in environmental consciousness rather than merely in government regulations. I would like to compliment all those individuals and organisations who are working assiduously in this direction. They have become the harbingers of a monumental change in our society. I assure them all possible support from the Government in their pursuits. Together, we will create a clean environment that will be the cornerstone of human empowerment!

Q9. According to the passage how can we ensure a path that will determine the well-being of the generations who will inhabit our planet after us?
(a)Sustainable consumption of the natural resources so that our upcoming generation doesn’t face a resource crunch
(b)By maintaining a balance between our greed and necessities so as to prevent the grave ecological imbalance
(c) By establishing more civilisations on the banks of rivers
(d)Both (a) and (b)
(e)None of these

Q10. According to the passage what is the meaning of “Doctrine of Trusteeship”?
(a)It is the responsibility of the present generation to ensure that our coming generations inherit a clean planet.
(b)It provides a means by which the wealthy people would be the trustees of sustainable consumption so that the world does not face a resource crunch.
(c)A means by which the wealthy people would be the trustees of trusts that looked after the welfare of the people in general.
(d)Both (a) and (c)
(e)None of these

Q11. According to the author how can people be made proactive in working towards a sustainable environment?
(a)Through talking, writing, debating, discussing as much as possible, on questions relating to the environment.
(b)By encouraging the research and innovation on subjects relating to the environment
(c)Making people aware of their strong links with environmental conservation and talking about it regularly
(d)Both (b) and (c)
(e)All (a), (b) and (c)

Q12.How the author has illustrated the meaning of ‘climate justice’ contextually as mentioned in the paragraph?
(a)Climate justice is a term used for framing global warming as an ethical and political issue, rather than one that is purely environmental or physical in nature.
(b)Climate justice is about safeguarding the rights and interests of the natural resources which are often the biggest sufferers from the menace of climate change.
(c)The essence of climate justice is the understanding that the urgent action needed to prevent climate change must be based on community-led solutions and the well-being of local communities, Indigenous Peoples and the global poor.
(d)Both (b) and (c)
(e)None of these

Q13.According to the passage what are the things that will determine how we as a society can bring a positive change?
(a)Internal consciousness
(b)Public awareness
(c)Proactiveness in working towards sustainable environment
(d)Both (b) and (c)
(e)All (a) (b) and (c)

Q14.Choose the word which is most nearly the SIMILAR in meaning to the word ‘quest’ printed in bold as used in the passage.
(a)Expedition
(b)Rapidity
(c)Readiness
(d)Celerity
(e)Alacrity

Q15. Choose the word which is most nearly the OPPOSITE in meaning to the word ‘menace’ printed in bold as used in the passage.
(a)Spirit
(b)Climate
(c)Atmosphere
(d)Character
(e)Safety

SOLUTIONS:

S1. Ans. (d)
Sol. Option (d) is the correct answer choice. Both the option (b) and (c) can be traced from the 2nd paragraph of passage where it is stated as “Incidentally, moving from the personal to the public, critics of English overlook the neutralising and nationally cohesive force that English exerts on linguistic rivalries within India — enabling equivalent commerce between, say, educated Tamil, Hindi and Bangla speakers without their having to face a potentially irksome Hindi monopoly in U.P., Tamil monopoly in Tamil Nadu, or Bangla monopoly in West Bengal. Take English out of that matrix and we will be faced with more divisive linguistic politics in the States.”

S2. Ans. (a)
Sol. Option (a) is the correct answer choice. Option (a) can be traced from the 3rd paragraph of passage where it is stated as “There is nothing wrong about such a call. Where Mr. Naidu, and many others, go wrong is by turning this call into an ‘either-or’ issue — either we pay attention to English or we pay attention to other Indian languages.” Option (b) can’t be true as discrimination is nowhere discussed in the paragraph. Thus option (a) is the best answer choice.

S3. Ans. (c)
Sol. Option (c) is the correct answer choice. Option (c) can be traced from the 1st paragraph of passage where it is stated as “Even though he was speaking on the occasion of Hindi Divas at Vigyan Bhawan in New Delhi and he espoused the cause of Hindi as a national language, he had in mind other Indian languages too. Mr. Naidu reportedly said that “all Indian languages” are “vibrant” and there are many other Indian languages which “are older and more vibrant than Hindi”. So, it was not, as his critics made it sound, a question of Hindi triumphalism. He was talking of Indian mother tongues in general, and excluding English from that category.” Option (b) was not the misinterpretation, it was the truth. So option (c) is the best answer choice.

S4. Ans. (d)
Sol. Option (d) is the correct answer choice. Option (a) and (b) can be traced from the 3rd paragraph of passage where it is stated as “If English is a ‘disease’ left behind by the British, then it is an advantageous disease: it has enabled the educated Indian middle class to be internationally competitive without any extra effort by the Indian government. In the pure sciences, medicine, engineering, literature, history, and so on, the easy access that a few million privileged Indians have to English texts has been converted into useful capital.”

S5. Ans. (a)
Sol. Option (a) is the correct answer choice. Option (a) can be traced from the 4th paragraph of passage where it is stated as “There is always a first language of specialised communication. In the ancient Indian past, it was Sanskrit, though other languages — often referred to as Prakrit — were spoken by the masses. In medieval Europe, it was Latin; in much of medieval Asia, it was Persian. These ‘proto-global’ languages did not lead to the death of other languages. Instead, they enabled the exchange of knowledge, thought, ideas. Today English is the global language, for better and for worse, and the British inadvertently gave Indians an edge here.”

S6. Ans. (c)
Sol. Option (c) is the correct answer choice.
Damp squib- a situation or event which is much less impressive than expected
To suffer the worst part of an unpleasant or problematic situation is the literal meaning of the phrase “Bear the brunt of”
So the correct answer choice is option (c).

S7. Ans. (e)
Sol. Option (e) is the correct answer choice.
Irksome- irritating; annoying.
Option (a) and (b) are the opposite in meaning to the given word. Thus option (e) is the correct answer choice.

S8. Ans. (d)
Sol. Option (d) is the correct answer choice.
Cosmopolitan- familiar with and at ease in many different countries and cultures
Provincial- of or concerning a province of a country or empire
Option (d) is the correct answer choice as it is the most opposite in meaning to the given word.

S9. Ans. (d)
Sol. Option (d) is the correct answer choice. Both the option (a) and (b) can be traced from the 1st paragraph of passage where it is stated as “Societies that live in harmony with nature flourish and prosper. Today, human society stands at an important crossroads. The path that we take hereon will not only determine our well-being but also that of the generations who will inhabit our planet after us. The imbalances between our greed and necessities have led to grave ecological imbalances. We can either accept this, go ahead with things as if it is business as usual, or we can take corrective actions.” The whole passage gives us the idea about the sustainable use of the natural resources.

S10. Ans. (a)
Sol. Option (a) is the correct answer choice. Option (a) can be traced from the 2nd paragraph of passage where it is stated as “He propounded the Doctrine of Trusteeship, which places the onus on us, the present generation, to ensure that our coming generations inherit a clean planet.” Although Option (c) is the literal explanation of the “doctrine of trusteeship” It provides a means by which the wealthy people would be the trustees of trusts that looked after the welfare of the people in general, but it is not mentioned in the passage.

S11. Ans. (e)
Sol. Option (e) is the correct answer choice. All the option (a) (b) and (c) can be traced from the 3rd paragraph of passage where it is stated as “We need to talk, write, debate, discuss and deliberate as much as possible on questions relating to the environment. At the same time, it is vital to encourage research and innovation on subjects relating to the environment. This is when more people will know about the pressing challenges of our times and ways to mitigate them. When we as a society are aware of our strong links with environmental conservation and talk about it regularly.”

S12. Ans. (c)
Sol. Option (c) is the correct answer choice. Option (c) can be traced from the 5th paragraph of passage where it is stated as “Climate justice is about safeguarding the rights and interests of the poor and marginalised sections of society, who are often the biggest sufferers from the menace of climate change.”

S13. Ans. (e)
Sol. Option (e) is the correct answer choice. All the options (a) (b) (c) are correct. First two options can be traced from the very first line of the 2nd and 3rd paragraph and the third option can be traced from the 3rd paragraph where it is stated as “When we as a society are aware of our strong links with environmental conservation and talk about it regularly, we will automatically be proactive in working towards a sustainable environment. That is why, I will put proactiveness as the third facet of bringing a positive change.” Thus the correct answer choice is option (e).

S14. Ans. (a)
Sol. Option (a) is the correct answer choice.
Quest- a long or arduous search for something
Expedition- a journey undertaken by a group of people with a particular purpose, especially that of exploration, research, or war
Alacrity- brisk and cheerful readiness
Celerity- swiftness of movement

S15. Ans. (e)
Sol. Option (e) is the correct answer choice.
Menace- a threatening quality or atmosphere

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