Basic English Grammar Rules Of Tenses

English Language section is difficult because it comprises most of the questions from grammar. One of the most important topic from grammar is Tenses and today we will be discussing everything related to it.

| Updated On May 5th, 2020 at 07:01 pm

English Language section becomes very important for a candidate if he/she is a banking aspirants because a lot of marks are carry by this section in both prelims and mains examination. This section can easily fetch you some very good marks if attempted carefully and with accuracy. In English Language section, a banking aspirant is supposed to be well-verse in Grammar  as it  forms majority of the questions that are asked in the examination. In this article, we will be covering one of the most important topic of English grammar that is Present Tense. 

What is Present Tense?

A present tense is defined as an action that is currently going on or habitually performed, or a state that currently or generally exists.

The Present tense is further divided into four types:

Present Indefinite

Present Continous

Present Perfect

Present Perfect Continous

Also read,

Present Indefinite:

It basically denote habit, custom, practice, repeated actions, general truth, permanent activity, etc. It is also  used for statements mentioning ‘historical present’ and ‘future arrangement’. (Eg: She leaves his job next week)

The correct structure of the sentence of Present Indefinite will be:

SUB + V1/ V5+ ………

SUB + IS/ AM/ ARE+ COMPLEMENT

  • Example: She work with an esteemed organization.

Also read,

Present Continous

The present continuous is also known as  the present progressive, it is a verb form used in modern English that combines the present tense with the continuous aspect.[

The correct structure of the sentence in Present continous will be:

SUB + IS/ AM/ ARE+ V4 (V+ing)…..

Example: He is working in Canada.

Present Perfect

The present perfect tense denotes an action or state that either occurred at an indefinite time in the past or began in the past and continued to the present time.

The correct structure of the sentence in present perfect will be:

SUB + has/have + V3 …..

  • Example: I have been to malaysia twice.

Present Perfect Continous

The present perfect continuous refers to  the amount of time for which an action has been taking place.

The correct structure of the sentence in present perfect continous will be:

SUB + has/have + been+ V4 (V+ing) ….. + (for/ since + time)

Example: Mohit has been working at that company for five years.

Rules Related To Simple present tense for First Person Singular:

‘I’ + verb (base form) + object (optional)

Example-

1) I study hard for exams.

2) I go to work every day.

The formula of  to convert it into negative sentences is:

‘I’ + do/ does not + verb (base form) + object (optional)

Example-

1) I do not work hard for exams.

2) I do not go to school everyday.

Also Read,

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Rule for converting it into Interrogative sentence is as follow:

Do/ Does + ‘I’ + verb (base form) + object (optional)?

Example-

1) Do I work hard for exams?

2) Do I go to school everyday?

Rule for converting it  into negative interrogative sentences is as follow:

Do/ Does + ‘I’ + ‘not’ + verb (base form) + object (optional)?

Example-

1) Do I not work hard for exams?

2) Do I not go to school everyday?

Rules Related To Simple Present Tense  for First Person Plural

The Rule for Simple Present Tense  for First Person Plural is as given below:

‘We’+ verb (base form) + object (optional)

Example-

1) We work hard for exams.

2) We go to school every day.

Just add do/does not after “We” to make it into negative sentence

Example-

1) We do not work hard for the exams.

2) We do not go to school everyday.

Rule for converting  into interrogative sentences is as given below:

Do/ Does + ‘we’ + verb (base form) + object (optional)?

Example:

1) Do we work hard for the exams?

 2) Do we go to work everyday?

Rule for converting it into negative interrogative sentences is as given below:

Do/ Does + ‘we’ + ‘not’ + verb (base form) + object (optional)?

Example-

1) Do we not work hard for the exams?

 2) Do we not go to work everyday?

Also Read,

Rules Related To Simple Present Tense for Second Person

The formula for simple present tense when a Second Person is involved is as follows –

 ‘You’ + verb (base form) + object (optional)

Example-

1) You work hard for exams.

2) You go to school every day.

Rule for converting it  into negative sentences is as given below:

‘You’ + do/ does not + verb (base form) + object (optional)

Example- 

1) You do not work hard for the exams.

2) You do not go to school everyday.

Rule for converting it into Interrogative Sentence is as given below

Do/ Does + ‘you’ + verb (base form) + object (optional)?

Example-

1) Do you work hard for the exams?

2) Do you go to school everyday?

Rule For converting these sentences into negative interrogative sentences is as given below: 

Do/ Does + ‘you’ + ‘not’ + verb (base form) + object (optional)?

Example-

1) Do you not work hard for the exams?

2) Do you not go to work everyday?

Rules Related To Simple Present Tense for Third Person Singular

Rule  for simple present tense for Third Person Singular is as follows –

He/ She/ Common Nouns/ Proper Nouns + verb (base form) with s/es at the end + object (optional)

Example-

1) She studies hard for exams.

2) Mother goes to work every day.

Rule for converting these sentences into negative sentences is as given below:

He/ She/ Proper Noun/ Common Noun + do/ does not + verb (base form) + object (optional)

Example-

1) She does not study hard for exams.

 2) Mother does not go to work everyday

Rule for converting these sentences into interrogative sentences is  given below:

Do/ Does + he/ she/ common noun/ proper noun + verb (base form) + object (optional)?

Example-

1) Does she study hard for the exam?

2) Does mother go to work everyday?

Rule for converting these sentences into negative interrogative sentences is as given below:

Do/ Does + he/ she/ proper noun/ common noun + ‘not’ + verb (base form) + object (optional)?

Example-

1) Does she not study hard for the exam?

2) Does mother not go to work everyday

Rules Related To Simple Present Tense Formula for Third Person Plural

Rule for simple present tense for Third Person Plural is as follows 

They/ Common Nouns + verb (base form) + object (optional)

Example-

1) They work hard for exams.

2) Girls go to work every day.

Rule for converting these sentences into negative sentences is as given below:

They/ common noun + do/ does not + verb (base form) + object (optional)

Example-

1) They do not work hard for the exams.

2) Girls do not go to work everyday.

Rule for converting these sentences into interrogative sentences is as given below:

Do/ Does + They/common noun + verb (base form) + object (optional)?

Example-

1) Do they work hard for the exams?

2) Do girls go to work everyday?

Rule for converting these sentences into negative interrogative sentences is as given below:

Do/ Does + They/ common noun + ‘not’ + verb (base form) + object (optional)?

Example-

1) Do they not work hard for the exams?

2) Do girls not go to work everyday?

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